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This is a native species.

Turritus glabra
Turritus glabra
Turritis glabra.  Synonym: Arabis glabra. (Tower Mustard).
Brassicaceae (Mustard Family)

Foothills, montane. Woodlands, openings, meadows. Summer.
Above and left: Navajo Lake Trail, Lizard Head Wilderness, June 25, 2024.

Turritis glabra grows to 4 feet tall. The plant shown on this page is just 2 feet tall and just beginning to flower.

Betty spotted this plant in deep grasses just above the West Fork of the Dolores River on the Navajo Lake Trail. About a dozen other Turritis glabra plants were nearby. These plants constitute a Dolores County record for Turritis glabra.

Although the photographs distinctly show the plant, in reality the plant blends in with the grasses and other herbaceous plants and is easy to miss. I never even noticed the plant on our way into the Lizard Head Wilderness, but Betty did and showed it to me on our return trip.

Although the small flowers are just beginning to open, some already show the beginnings of the tubular seed pods, one of which the arrow points to.

Linnaeus gave the genus name in 1753 using the Latin "turritis", "tower". In the 1830s in "Rocky situations in the woods of Oregon" Thomas Nuttall was the first to find the plant for science in North America. However, Nuttall named the plant, Turritis macrocarpa.

Turritus glabra

Turritis glabra.  Synonym: Arabis glabra. (Tower Mustard).
Brassicaceae (Mustard Family)

Foothills, montane. Woodlands, openings, meadows. Summer.
Navajo Lake Trail, Lizard Head Wilderness, June 25, 2024.

Stem leaves are lanceolate (as here) to ovate, entire, mostly glabrous (with a few stellate hairs), sessile, clasping the stem, and often auriculate (clasping with ear-like projections making the over-all leaf appearance somewhat sagittate (arrow-shaped).

Turritus glabra

Turritis glabra.  Synonym: Arabis glabra. (Tower Mustard).
Brassicaceae (Mustard Family)

Foothills, montane. Woodlands, openings, meadows. Summer.
Navajo Lake Trail, Lizard Head Wilderness, June 25, 2024.

Basal leaves shape is often different from stem leaf shape. Basal leaves often are oblanceolate, with wavy margins, and the surface has many stellate hairs.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Turritus glabra

Range map for Turritis glabra