Workshop 1: Names   Workshop 2: Definitions and plant parts  Workshop 3: Keys   
Workshop 4: Keys
   Workshop 6: Keys and species

 
Note the two family names.  Note also the amazing amount of information that Weber packs into a small space.

Arnica cordifolia

Arnica cordifolia, ARCO9

Arnica cordifolia

Each grouping (1a/1b, 2a/2b, 3a/3b) is  called a couplet.  Note that the distinguishing characteristics in each couplet are physical features that we can observe:

Opposite vs. alternate leaves
Shape of phyllaries
Shape of flower head
Size of leaves
Kind of root

  Terms to understand:
Ligulate, pappus, involucre, plumose, alternate/opposite, phyllaries, turbinate, rhizome, receptacle: (think of what is left of the Dandelion after the silvery puff of seeds is gone).

Arnica cordifolia, arco9

Arnica L. 1753 means?

Arnica cordifolia

Arnica mollis

Notice the differences in the pappus hairs: capillary versus barbellate, plumose.  Other pappus terms: awns, scales, or bristles.

Fragrances are useful in identifying plants.  Arnicas often have a lemon fragrance.

Terms to understand:
Ray/disk, cauline, obtuse/acute, subplumose, barbellate, rosette, lanceolate, petiole, basal rosette, cordate, achene, apomictic, and the many terms that describe hairiness and hairs (trichomes): pubescent, puberulent, pustulose, tomentose, stellate, strigate, sericeous, hirsute, villous, pilose, glandular, glaucous. 

Apomictic (without mixing): producing seeds from unfertilized ovules.

These terms don't have to be memorized; refer to your flora's glossary.

Workshop 1: Names   Workshop 2: Definitions and plant parts   Workshop 3: Keys   
Workshop 4: Keys
   Workshop 6: Keys and species