SEARCH AND WILDFLOWER HOME PAGE      YELLOW FLOWERS     CONTACT US

      See Senecio atratus for a discussion of the differences between Senecio, Ligularia, and Packera.
Senecio crassulus (Thick-leaf Ragwort)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane, subalpine, alpine. Meadows, openings. Summer.
Middle Calico Trail, August 9, 2004.

Senecio crassulus is a common plant of high meadows, especially above tree-line.  It grows eight-to-twenty inches tall with thick, dark green, coarsely-toothed, hairy, often vertical leaves that clasp the stem or have winged petioles

Senecio crassulus

Senecio crassulus ray petals are yellow to yellow-gold and the central disk flowers are golden.  Senecio crassulus often grows near the similar looking Hymenoxys hoopesii which is, however, taller with larger flowers and leaves.  Senecio integerrimus, which also is common in low-to-high mountain meadows, has smaller flowers, few small leaves on the main stem, and is usually quite hairy.

Charles Parry collected Senecio crassulus in Colorado and it was named by Asa Gray in 1883. "Crass" is Latin for "thick". "Senecio" is from the Latin, "senes", "old man", and refers to the pappus hairs, the tiny bristle, hair, or awn growth at the apex of the seeds in Asteraceae.

Click for more Senecio crassulus.

Senecio crassulus (Thick-leaf Ragwort)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane, subalpine, alpine. Meadows, openings. Summer.
Black Bear Pass Road, July 20, 2008.

Flower heads are medium-sized, but in large and showy clusters.  There are few, but long and narrow ray flowers.  Notice under the long yellow ray flowers there is a bulging involucre, the collection of green phyllaries.

 

Senecio eremophilus (Lonely Ragwort, Desert Ragwort)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane, subalpine. Disturbed areas, openings. Summer.
Sneffels Highline Trail, August 4, 2004.

Senecio eremophilus is a tall, stalky plant with small, bright yellow flowers.  It commonly grows to three feet tall, and its dark green, incised leaves are hallmarks.  Senecio eremophilus is fairly common in mountain and subalpine rocky areas.  Look for it also along roadsides.

John Richardson collected the first specimens of this plant for science when he was on the 1819-1822 Franklin Expedition in Canada and along the northern Pacific Coast.  He named the plant in 1823.  "Erem" is Greek for "lonely places" and "philo" for "loving".

Senecio eremophilus
Senecio eremophilus (Lonely Ragwort, Desert Ragwort)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane, subalpine. Disturbed areas, openings. Summer.
Robertson Pasture Trail, Abajo Mountains, Utah, August 1, 2014.

 

Senecio eremophilus (Lonely Ragwort, Desert Ragwort)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Montane, subalpine. Disturbed areas, openings. Summer.
Sneffels Highline Trail, August 4, 2004.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Senecio crassulus

Range map for Senecio eremophilus  

WILDFLOWER HOME PAGE        YELLOW FLOWERS     CONTACT US