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Click to read about the Ribes genus.

   To red flowering Ribes.  To white flowering Ribes.

Ribes aureum
Ribes aureum (Golden Currant)
Grossulariaceae (Gooseberry Family)

Foothills.  Shrublands, meadows, streamsides.  Spring.
Near Yellowjacket Canyon, April 16, 2004.

Ribes aureum's delicate lemon-yellow flowers show brightly in early spring-green foliage. The flowers are followed by golden, then orange, then red, juicy and very tasty berries. Golden Currant is relatively uncommon in the Four Corners area, but it can sometimes be found in abundance in the foothills along streams and ponds. Its gently scalloped leaves often change to deep maroon in the fall.

Ribes aureum was first collected by Meriwether Lewis in April of 1806 in what is now the state of Washington "on the banks of the rivers Missouri and Columbia". (Lewis' words as quoted in Intermountain Flora.) Pursh named and described the plant in his Flora of North America, 1814. "Aureum" is Latin for "gold".

Ribes aureum (Golden Currant)
Grossulariaceae (Gooseberry Family)

Foothills.  Shrublands, meadows, streamsides.  Spring.
Near Yellowjacket Canyon, April 16, 2004.

Ribes aureum (Golden Currant)
Grossulariaceae (Gooseberry Family)

Foothills.  Shrublands, meadows, streamsides.  Spring.
Near Yellowjacket Canyon, June 26, 2004.

Sweet and ready to eat.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Ribes aureum