SEARCH AND WILDFLOWER HOME PAGE     YELL0W FLOWERS     CONTACT US



   See more Packera.

Packera streptanthifolia

Packera streptanthifolia

Packera streptanthifolia. Synonym: Packera oodes. (Rocky Mountain Groundsel, Rocky Mountain Ragwort)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Foothills, montane. Woodlands, openings. Summer.
Lone Mesa State Park, July 2, 2008
Hillside Road, June 17, 2015.

Packera streptanthifolia has a growth habit similar to that of the very common P. neomexicana and it is easy to pass it by not realizing that it is a different species.  The basal leaves of P. streptanthifolia are, in Weber's words, "oval or cordate on long, slender petioles, regularly crenate"; the basal leaves of P. neomexicana are "narrower on winged petioles, irregularly toothed, lobed, or entire". Also P. streptanthifolia tends to grow in larger and denser clusters.

Notice in the two photographs at left that there are numerous flower stems, that last year's dried, buff-colored stems still show, that leaves are in a dense mat, and that petioles are quite long.

Packera streptanthifolia is also very similar to P. pseudaurea. The two are separated most easily by their hairiness; P. streptanthifolia is usually woolly hairy whereas P. pseudaurea is usually glabrous.

The taxonomic history of this plant is a bit convoluted.  Apparently Thomas Nuttall was the first to collect it, in Oregon, in late 1834 or early 1835.  He named the plant Senecio cymbalarioides in 1841 and the plant went through a number of name changes in the next 150 years.  Edward Greene named it Senecio streptanthifolius in 1895 and Weber named it Packera streptanthifolia in 1981 but, according to Intermountain Flora, changed the name in 1984 to Packera oodes following Per Axel Rydberg's 1906 name of Senecio oodes.  Weber, however, indicates that he did not change the name as Intermountain Flora indicates; instead he maintains that there are two distinct species, P. streptanthifolia and P. oodes, differing primarily in their pubescence and the shape of their basal leaves. 

John Kartesz, ultimate authority for plant names on this web site, and the Flora of North America indicate that Weber's two species are actually just one, P. streptanthifolia.

John Packer is a Canadian botanist. (More biographical information about Packera.) "Oodes" is Greek for "egg-shaped".  Streptanthifolia is Greek for "twisting foliage".

Packera streptanthifolia

Packera streptanthifolia

Packera streptanthifolia. Synonym: Packera oodes. (Rocky Mountain Groundsel, Rocky Mountain Ragwort)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Foothills, montane. Woodlands, openings. Summer.
Lone Mesa State Park, July 2, 2008.

Hillside Road, June 17, 2015.

Flower head stems (peduncles) are very lightly hairy in the top photograph at left but densely tomentose (white, woolly hairy) in the bottom photograph. Hairiness can vary fairly widely from one population to another and also varies with the age of the plant.

Packera streptanthifolia

Packera streptanthifolia. Synonym: Packera oodes. (Rocky Mountain Groundsel, Rocky Mountain Ragwort)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Foothills, montane. Woodlands, openings. Summer.
Lone Mesa State Park, July 2, 2008.

Hillside Road, June 17, 2015.

Stem leaves are few, reduced in size upward, and vary from deeply to shallowly indented, i.e., pinnate and lobed They are definitely not the same shape and size as the oval to round basal leaves.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Packera streptanthifolia