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Hieracium triste      Hieracium triste
Hieracium triste. Synonyms: Chlorocrepis tristis subspecies gracilis, Hieracium gracilis. (Woolly Hawkweed)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)  

Montane, subalpine, alpine. Meadows.  Summer, fall.
Lake Hope Trail, August 11, 2009.

Hieracium triste is a minutely slender plant often lost in the greenery of other more robust plants. The two photographs at left show the top and bottom part of the same plant split in two so you can better see the slender Hieracium triste almost lost in the robust leaves of Marsh Marigolds, Caltha leptosepala. The hairy stem between the 7 and 8 inch ruler marks is Rosy Paintbrush, Castilleja rhexiifoliawhose pink flowers are behind the ruler.

Look for Hieracium triste blooming at high altitudes in late summer and early fall and a bit earlier as low as 7,500 feet.

This species was named Hieracium triste by Carl Willdenow in the description by Kurt Sprengel in 1826. William Jackson Hooker named the plant Hieracium gracile in 1833 and Löve and Löve renamed it Chlorocrepis tristis in 1975.

Hieracium is, according to botanical Latin expert William Stearn, the classical name given to various composite flowers in the Mediterranean area and the word is supposedly derived from the Greek word for "Falcon". Thus the plants are still commonly called, "Hawkweeds".

"Chloro" is Greek for "green" and "crepis" is a name given by Pliny several thousand years ago to a now unknown plant.  "Trist" is Latin for "dull" or "sad" and "gracilis" is Latin for "slender".

Hieracium triste

Hieracium triste

Hieracium triste

Hieracium triste

Hieracium triste. Synonyms: Chlorocrepis tristis subspecies gracilis, Hieracium gracilis. (Woolly Hawkweed)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)  

Montane, subalpine, alpine. Meadows.  Summer, fall.
Lake Hope Trail, August 11, 2009;
Lizard Head Trail, July 18, 2012 and August 4, 2010, and
Eagle Peak Trail, August, 29, 2014.

Flower heads are composed only of ray flowers.

Phyllaries and petioles are usually covered with a mixture of longer silky-silvery hairs and shorter bristly-glandular black hairs.

In the manner common to many Asteraceae, fertilized flowers explode into a mass of pappus hairs which will carry seeds on the winds.

Hieracium triste
 
Hieracium triste. Synonyms: Chlorocrepis tristis subspecies gracilis, Hieracium gracilis. (Woolly Hawkweed)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)  

Montane, subalpine, alpine. Meadows.  Summer, fall.
Lake Hope Trail, August 11, 2009.

Basal leaves can range from hairy to glabrous, from smooth-margined to slightly serrated, and from long and narrow to almost circular (always with petioles).

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Hieracium triste