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Encelia resinifera variety resinosa
Encelia resinifera
Encelia resinifera variety resinosa.  Synonym: Encelia frutescens. (Sticky Brittlebush).
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Semi-desert. Openings. Spring and summer.
Above: Hidden Valley Trail, Utah, October 21, 2013 and Left: Butler Wash, Utah, August 27, 2007.

This handsome shrub grows in rocky, sandy areas to four feet high and wide with rough, shiny, spade-shaped to nearly round leaves and numerous lemon-yellow flowers. Encelia resinifera flowers from late spring through the summer and even into the fall, depending on moisture and warmth.

Some sources, including Arthur Cronquist of Intermountain Flora and Philip Munz, expert California botanist, indicate that the genus name honors Christopher Encel, a 16th century botanist who published a book on oak galls in 1577. Other very reputable sources indicate that the person honored is Christoph Entzelt, Lutheran clergyman who wrote a book about medicinal uses of plants in 1551. With little more to base my judgment on, I would stay with the expert views of Cronquist and Munz.  It also is most plausible that the Latin version of the name "Encel" would produce "Encelia".  (More biographical information about Encel.)

The Flora of North America and the Synthesis now indicate that Encelia frutescens is a species of Arizona, southern California, and southern Nevada.  Encelia resinifera is found in southern Utah and Arizona.  This plant was first named Encelia resinosa by Brandegee in 1907 and renamed E. resinifera by Clark in 1998.

Encelia resinifera

Encelia resinifera

Encelia resinifera variety resinosa.  Synonym: Encelia frutescens. (Sticky Brittlebush).
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Semi-desert. Openings. Spring and summer.
Hidden Valley Trail, Utah, October 21, 2013.

Flowerheads are single at the end of long stems; ray flowers are usually present in our area; corollas are orange-yellow; phyllaries are short-hairy, in 3 or 4 overlapping series, and broadly lance-shaped.

Encelia resinifera variety resinosa

Encelia resinifera variety resinosa

Encelia resinifera variety resinosa.  Synonym: Encelia frutescens. (Sticky Brittlebush).
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Semi-desert. Openings. Spring and summer.
Hidden Valley Trail, Utah, Utah, October 21, 2013 and Lower Butler Wash, Utah, August 27, 2007.

Leaves are thick and green and appear to be smooth until one takes a closer look and then the usually present glandular, pustulate-based hairs become apparent. Leaves can also have short, stiff hairs.

In all of the photographs on this page, notice the white stems, remnants of the previous year's growth.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Encelia resinifera