SEARCH AND WILDFLOWER HOME PAGE      YELLOW FLOWERS     CONTACT US



     For several centuries there has been disagreement among botanists about whether there are two distinct genera, Berberis and Mahonia, or just one, either Berberis or MahoniaClick to read the nomenclatural story.

Click for Berberis fendleri in fall color.

Berberis fendleri

Berberis fendleri (Fendler's Barberry)
Berberidaceae (Barberry Family)

Montane. Woodlands.  Summer.
Calico National Recreation Trail, June 16, 2004.

These slender bushes grow in scattered colonies or thickets, especially in the shade of Ponderosa Pines. Typically there are three or four woody stems with alternate clusters of leaves and pendulous sprays of bright yellow flowers emanating from leaf axils.  (See the flowers arched over at the 18 inch mark on the ruler.)

"Berberis" is, according to Weber, from "Berberys", the Arabic name for the fruit.  Augustus Fendler was a well known plant collector of the 19th century. (More biographical information about Fendler.)

Click for Berberis fendleri in fall color.

Berberis fendleri

Berberis fendleri

Berberis fendleri

Berberis fendleri (Fendler's Barberry)
Berberidaceae (Barberry Family)

Montane. Woodlands.  Summer.
Dolores River Canyon, May 6, 2016.
Calico National Recreation Trail, June 18 and 2014 and June 16, 2004.

Berberis fendleri

Berberis fendleri (Fendler's Barberry)
Berberidaceae (Barberry Family)

Montane. Woodlands.  Summer.
Calico National Recreation Trail, June 16, 2004.

Three-to-five parted spines grow quite stout at the bottom of the woody stems.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Berberis fendleri