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    Artemis was Apollo's twin sister and daughter of Zeus and Leto; she was the equivalent of the Greek Diana, goddess of the moon, the woods, and the wild, who, the legend states, derived so much good from plants of this kind that all such plants are named for her. 

    Intermountain Flora presents another etymology: the genus is named for Artemisia, historical Queen of Caria (in present day Turkey) who was a "noted botanist, medical researcher, and scholar".  She was named for the Greek god.

    See more Artemisia   and   Artemisia shrubs.

Artemisia filifolia

Artemisia filifolia

Artemisia filifolia

Artemisia filifolia (Sand Sagebrush)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Semi-desert. Shrublands, sand. Late summer, fall.
Arches National Park, Utah, May 4, 2005 and March 31, 2016.

This faintly and pleasantly aromatic and very handsome high desert Sage grows from two-to-five feet tall and wide in deep sandy soils. Hundreds of Artemisia filifolia can be encountered when the the species finds its favorite sandy soils, as it does, for instance, on the Devil's Garden Trail in Arches National Park.

Arching, slender leaves are long and narrow and range from .6 to 8 cm long and .3 to 1.5 mm wide. The long leaves are often subtended by shorter clusters of leaves, as can be seen at the bottom center of the second photograph and throughout the third photograph. The narrow foliage gives rise to the Latin specific epithet, "filifolia".

The plant was named and described by John Torrey in 1827 from a specimen collected by Edward James on the "arid plains to the Platte [River]" in 1820.

Artemisia filifolia

Artemisia filifolia

Artemisia filifolia (Sand Sagebrush)
Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Semi-desert. Shrublands, sand. Late summer, fall.
Arches National Park, Utah, May 4, 2005 and Comb Ridge, Utah, November 29, 2012.

The leaves, young stems, and tiny yellow/brown flower bracts are covered in soft, silvery hairs.

Artemisia filifolia flowers yellow-to-brown in late summer and fall.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Artemisia filifolia