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Plantago patagonica
 
Plantago patagonica (Woolly Plantain)
Plantaginaceae (Plantain Family)

Semi-desert, foothills. Openings, canyons. Spring to early summer.
Corona Arch Trail, Utah, April 13, 2005.

This is a very common, very small, very cute plant.  Leaves are quite hairy and flowers are white, quite small, and densely packed together.   Woolly Plantain's presence is often indicative of overgrazed and barren soils.

Linnaeus named this genus in 1753 and Nicolaus Jacquin named the species in the late 1700s from a specimen collected in Patagonia.

"Planta", Latin for the "sole of the foot", refers to the leaf shape of some Plantains.  Plantago patagonica is common not only in the Western United States but also in Argentina and Chile.

Plantago patagonica

 
Plantago patagonica (Woolly Plantain)
Plantaginaceae (Plantain Family)

Semi-desert, foothills. Openings, canyons. Spring to early summer.
Corona Arch Trail, Utah, April 13, 2005 and Mesa Verde National Park, May 29, 2013.

Delicate and lovely flowers are open on the bottom third of the flowering stem in the top photograph at left and on most of the of the flowering stem in the bottom photograph.

 
Plantago patagonica (Woolly Plantain)
Plantaginaceae (Plantain Family)

Semi-desert, foothills. Openings, canyons. Spring to early summer.
Corona Arch Trail, Utah, April 13, 2005.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Plantago patagonica