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Phacelia ivesiana

Phacelia ivesiana variety ivesiana (Ives' Phacelia, Ives' Scorpionweed)
Boraginaceae (Forget-Me-Not Family)

Semi-desert.  Shrublands, openings.  Spring, summer.
Devil's Garden Trail, Arches National Park, Utah, May 4, 2005.

Phacelia ivesiana is fairly common, but often unobserved, in the Pinyon Pine/Utah Juniper under-story.  Look for it at the base of Utah Junipers.  It also grows, as pictured here, in open sandy areas.  In early spring it is just under two inches tall, but it can grow to eight inches.

The plant was first found for science by J. S. Newberry in Arizona and was named by John Torrey in 1860 for Eli Ives, Professor of Pharmacy at Yale.  (More biographical information.)  "Phacelus" is Greek for "bundle" and refers to the clusters of flower branches.

 

Phacelia ivesiana

Phacelia ivesiana variety ivesiana (Ives' Phacelia, Ives' Scorpionweed)
Boraginaceae (Forget-Me-Not Family)

Semi-desert.  Shrublands, openings.  Spring, summer.
Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, April 27, 2010.

It is common to find scores of plants crowded in a tight cluster in the acid shade of Utah Junipers.

 

Phacelia ivesiana

Phacelia ivesiana

Phacelia ivesiana

Phacelia ivesiana variety ivesiana (Ives' Phacelia, Ives' Scorpionweed)
Boraginaceae (Forget-Me-Not Family)

Semi-desert.  Shrublands, openings.  Spring, summer.
Devil's Garden Trail, Arches National Park, Utah, May 4, 2005 and
Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, April 27, 2010.

Flowers are quite tiny, yellow throated, and arranged in the typical Phacelia scorpion tail (although this is often very difficult to notice because the flowers are so small). In a manner not so characteristic of Phacelias, the stamens and styles do not extend beyond the floral tube. 

The plant is prominently hairy, often glandular, i.e., sticky hairy, as can be seen by the clinging sand particles.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Phacelia ivesiana