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Agastache pallidiflora

Agastache pallidiflora

Agastache pallidiflora

Agastache pallidiflora (Giant Hyssop)
Lamiaceae (Mint Family)

Montane.  Rocks, moist meadows.  Summer, fall.
Vallecito Creek Trail, September 13, 2010 and September 12, 2011.

Agastache pallidiflora grows single or numerous stems to over thirty inches tall.  Flowers are +- 1/3 of an inch long, arise from prominent pale green clayces, and occur in densely packed clusters.  Flower color ranges from white through pink to light purple. 

The plants shown here belong to the variety "pallidiflora", which grows in Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado.  Click to see the more consistently pink flowering variety "neomexicana", which grows throughout western and central New Mexico and in just a few counties of southern Arizona and western Texas. 

Jan Gronovius named this genus (based on John Clayton's notes) in 1762. The species was at first named Brittonastrum pallidiflora by Amos Heller in 1899.  Per Axel Rydberg renamed it Agastache pallidiflora in 1906. 

Greek gives us both "agan" ("many") and "stachys" ("spikes").  "Pallidiflora" is Latin for "pale flower".

 

Agastache urticifolia
Agastache urticifolia

Agastache urticifolia

Agastache urticifolia

Agastache urticifolia (Nettleleaf Giant Hyssop)
Lamiaceae (Mint Family)

Montane, subalpine.  Rocks, meadows.  Summer, fall.
Above and left: Land's End Road, Grand Mesa, July 13, 2017.

Agastache urticifolia commonly grows with masses of flowering stems from 1 to 3 (and even to 5) feet tall.  Pleasantly scented flowers are about 1/2 of an inch long with very prominently exserted stamens. Dozens of flowers are packed into showy heads.  Flower color ranges from white through pink to light purple. Agastache urticifolia grows in woodlands, moist to dry meadows, open slopes, and at low and high elevations. 

Jan Gronovius named this genus (based on John Clayton's notes) in 1762. From specimens collected in the 1820s by David Douglas on the northwest coast of America, the species was first named Lophanthus urticifolius by Bentham in 1829 and was renamed by Kuntze Agastache urticifolia in 1891.

Greek gives us both "agan" ("many") and "stachys" ("spikes").  Leaves are cut in a manner reminiscent of Urtica (Nettle) leaves. "Urticifolia" is Latin for "nettle-like foliage".

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
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Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Agastache pallidiflora

Range map for Agastache pallidiflora

Agastache urticifolia

Range map for Agastache urticifolia