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Click to read about how to identify Willows.

Salix amygdaloides
Salix laevigata (Peach Leaf Willow)
Salicaceae (Willow Family)

Plains and foothills. Wetlands. Spring, summer. Mike and Mona's Five Springs Farm, near Dove Creek, Colorado, July 14, 2010.

Salix laevigata is found along streams in the southwestern United States.  The plant shown was found in Colorado quite near the Utah border; once confirmed this will be a Colorado state record.

Salix laevigata grows to forty-five feet tall.  It has red-to-brown branchlets (and is sometimes called "Red Willow"). Leaves are pale below, shining on top, and 3-5 times longer than wide.

Willow expert, M. S. Bebb, named this plant in 1874 from a collection made by C. L. Anderson near Santa Cruz, California.

"Laevigata" is Latin for "smooth or slippery".

Salix amygdaloides

Salix laevigata (Peach Leaf Willow)
Salicaceae (Willow Family)

Plains and foothills. Wetlands. Spring, summer. Mike and Mona's Five Springs Farm, near Dove Creek, Colorado, July 14, 2010.

When trees are damaged by wind or cutting, they often send up numerous sprouts.

Salix amygdaloides

Salix laevigata (Peach Leaf Willow)
Salicaceae (Willow Family)

Plains and foothills. Wetlands. Spring, summer. Mike and Mona's Five Springs Farm, near Dove Creek, Colorado, July 14, 2010.

Stipules (the tiny leaf-like appendages at the base of the leaves [see red arrow]) range from the normal minute and soon deciduous to the less common, six millimeter, and more persistent.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

laevigata

Range map for Salix leavigata