SEARCH AND WILDFLOWER HOME PAGE     PINK/RED/ORANGE FLOWERS     CONTACT US



Linnaeus named this genus in 1753.

Also see Trifolium hybridum and T. pratense and Trifolium repens and T. gymnocarpon.

Trifolium brandegei

Trifolium brandegeei (Brandegee's Clover)
Fabaceae (Pea Family)

Subalpine, alpine. Openings. Summer.
Gold Run Trail, June 17, 2004.

At high altitudes, hikers eyes are arrested by these hot, iridescent, satin pink flowers drooping from leafless stalks.  Leaves are in threes along the ground with the leafless flower stalk standing straight above them.

"Brandegeei" honors Townshend Brandegee, botanist with the Hayden Survey of 1875; he published "The Flora of Southwestern Colorado" in 1876 as part of the Hayden Survey report.  Brandegee was the first to collect Trifolium brandegeei (in 1874) and it is the only plant in this web site named for him.  Brandegee described it as "a very showy species, common in the Sierra La Plata."   (Click for more biographical information about Brandegee.)

Trifolium brandegei
Trifolium brandegeei (Brandegee's Clover)
Fabaceae (Pea Family)

Subalpine, alpine. Openings. Summer.
Sharkstooth Trail, July 14, 2006.

I love the shape of these flowers: the clustering of downward drooping flowers, the flare from top to bottom, the upturned edges of the banner, and the contrast of the sharply pointed sepals.  And, of course, the rose-sheen color added to the shape makes this an even more attractive plant.

Trifolium brandegei

Trifolium brandegei

 

 

 

Trifolium brandegeei (Brandegee's Clover)
Fabaceae (Pea Family)

Subalpine, alpine. Openings. Summer.
Road to Spiller/Helmet Ridge, June 19, 2007 and Upper West Mancos Trail, October 1, 2010.

It is common to find dozens of Trifolium brandegeei plants together. 

The upper section of the West Mancos Trail in the La Plata Mountains has numerous large areas of Trifolium brandegeei.  It was in the La Plata Mountains that Townshend Brandegee collected the first specimens of this plant. 

Fall colors are various shades of yellow.  Trifolium brandegei

 

Trifolium parryi

Trifolium parryi
Trifolium parryi subspecies parryi (Parry's Clover)
Fabaceae (Pea Family)

Subalpine, alpine. Openings. Summer.
Above: Pass Creek Trail, July 13, 2016.
Left: Upper Calico Trail, July 13, 2004.

Trifolium parryi is common, sometimes scattered and sometimes in dense colonies in moist subalpine openings and alpine tundra. Solitary flower stalks are leafless and erect and flower clusters are considerably above the leaves. Flower color ranges through pinks and lavender/purples.

In 1862 Asa Gray named this plant for Charles Parry, a highly respected 19th century explorer and naturalist who collected it "On high alpine grassy slopes" at the head-waters of South Clear Creek, east of Middle Park, Colorado. (Information from Intermountain Flora).  (Click for more biographical information about Parry.)

Trifolium parryi

Trifolium parryi

Trifolium parryi subspecies parryi (Parry's Clover)
Fabaceae (Pea Family)

Subalpine, alpine. Openings. Summer.
Pass Creek Trail, July 19, 2007.
U.S. Basin, August 4, 2015.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color Key

Species present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Range map for Trifolium brandegeei  

Range map for Trifolium parryi