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Clinopodium vulgare
Clinopodium vulgare.  Synonym: Satureja vulgaris. (Wild Basil)
Lamiaceae (Mint Family)

Montane. Open rocky areas. Summer, fall.
Vallecito Creek Trail, September 12, 2011.

Clinopodium vulgare is native in the Northern Hemisphere but exactly where is debated.  Kartesz indicates (see map below) that it is introduced in the Western United States.

The plant grows to about 20 inches tall and spreads by rhizomes into small groupings.  Flowers are delicate and small in tight clusters at short intervals along the stem.  This is a very uncommon plant in the Four Corners area.

In 1753 Linnaeus named this species Clinopodium vulgare from specimens collected in Europe and Canada.  In 1897 Karl Fritsch renamed the plant Satureja vulgaris.

Clinopodium vulgare

Clinopodium vulgare.  Synonym: Satureja vulgaris. (Wild Basil)
Lamiaceae (Mint Family)

Montane. Open rocky areas. Summer, fall.
Vallecito Creek Trail, September 12, 2011.

Clinopodium vulgare is a member of the Mint Family but surprisingly it has little to no Mint odor.

Clinopodium vulgare

Clinopodium vulgare.  Synonym: Satureja vulgaris. (Wild Basil)
Lamiaceae (Mint Family)

Montane. Open rocky areas. Summer, fall.
Vallecito Creek Trail, September 12, 2011. 

The pointed, hairy calyces provide a sharp contrast to the delicate lines of the corolla. Notice the fine hairs on the calyces, flowers, and leaves.

Range map © John Kartesz,
Floristic Synthesis of North America

State Color KeySpecies present in state and native
Species present in state and exotic
Species not present in state

County Color Key

Species present and not rare
Species present and rare
Species extirpated (historic)
Species extinct
Species noxious
Species exotic and present
Native species, but adventive in state
Eradicated
Questionable presence

Clinopodium vulgare

Range map for Clinopodium vulgare